Posts tagged with 'waiver'

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If you’re facing removal, you will have to show the government that you don’t meet any of the grounds for deportability. Due to some quirky legal rules, the specific grounds for deportability are different from the grounds for inadmissibility, but broadly speaking, they are both divided into criminal and non-criminal categories.

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Whether you’re applying for a visa to enter the US, attempting to avoid removal, or adjusting your immigration status, you’ll need to show that you are admissible to the United States. The government has identified certain reasons why you might not be admissible.

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There are several ways in which your criminal history may impact your admissibility into the US as a noncitizen. We’ve already discussed the admissibility consequences of crimes of moral turpitude (CMTs) and drug crimes in previous posts, but there are a few other grounds of inadmissibility that may apply if you have ever been convicted of a crime inside or ...

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Drug crimes – even crimes for which you haven’t been convicted, or even charged – can land you in hot water if you are attempting to gain admission to the US, facing removal, or trying to adjust your status. Below, we’ll discuss some of the consequences of drug crimes in the context of immigration law. If you have questions or ...

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If you’re inadmissible because you have engaged in certain types of criminal activity, you may be eligible for a waiver of inadmissibility. These waivers apply to five specific grounds of inadmissibility.

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The first step in figuring out if you are removable or eligible for adjustment of status is to determine whether or not you were “admitted” to the US.

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The US government has identified a number of countries that are experiencing conditions that would prevent nationals from safely returning. If you are from one of these countries, you may be eligible for a form of relief from removal called Temporary Protected Status (“TPS”).

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