Posts tagged with 'inadmissible'

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If you’re facing removal, you will have to show the government that you don’t meet any of the grounds for deportability. Due to some quirky legal rules, the specific grounds for deportability are different from the grounds for inadmissibility, but broadly speaking, they are both divided into criminal and non-criminal categories.

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Drug crimes – even crimes for which you haven’t been convicted, or even charged – can land you in hot water if you are attempting to gain admission to the US, facing removal, or trying to adjust your status. Below, we’ll discuss some of the consequences of drug crimes in the context of immigration law. If you have questions or ...

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There is no exact definition of the phrase “crime of moral turpitude,” but generally, it refers to crimes that seem inherently wrong or immoral to a reasonable person. Crimes that involve an element of fraud, or an intentional effort to seriously injure another person, will probably qualify as crimes of moral turpitude.

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If you’re inadmissible because you have engaged in certain types of criminal activity, you may be eligible for a waiver of inadmissibility. These waivers apply to five specific grounds of inadmissibility.

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The first step in figuring out if you are removable or eligible for adjustment of status is to determine whether or not you were “admitted” to the US.

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If the immigration judge determines that you are inadmissible or deportable from the US, you may still be able to avoid removal if you can show that you are eligible for one of the various forms of relief from removal.

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The US government has identified a number of countries that are experiencing conditions that would prevent nationals from safely returning. If you are from one of these countries, you may be eligible for a form of relief from removal called Temporary Protected Status (“TPS”).

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If you have been placed in removal proceedings, you may be detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) until an immigration judge decides whether or not you should be removed from the US. However, ICE is only able to detain a small percentage of people who are in removal proceedings, and you will probably be allowed to remain free ...

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U.S. citizens and noncitizens alike know that convictions for drug possession often have very serious consequences. In recent years, however, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) and its related agencies have reduced or eliminated the immigration consequences for certain marijuana convictions.

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